remarks upon method

remarks upon method: Karen Kramer, Epona’s Well

18.06 – 28.06.2015
Jupiter Woods, London

 

Karen Kramer,  Epona's Well , 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer, Epona's Well, 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer,  Epona's Well , 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer, Epona's Well, 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer,  Epona's Well , 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer, Epona's Well, 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer,  Epona's Well , 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

Karen Kramer, Epona's Well, 2015. Video still. Image courtesy the artist and Jupiter Woods, London. 

remarks upon method was a curatorial groundwork, a methodological exploration. It arouse from an urgency to develop meaningful, intimate modes of engagement with certain research-led artistic practices that do not unfurl comfortably in the traditional exhibition format. As such, it was an invitation that enabled the emphasis to fall on the intricate processes of association, across interdisciplinary source material. Visibility was granted to aspects of an artist’s practice that are commonly discarded in a group or solo exhibition.

Epona’s Well was a ten-day presentation by Karen Kramer (USA) at Jupiter Woods, conceived as a depository and reliquary, memorial and inventory. It introduced a constellation of fragmentary artefacts and organic remains, gathered by the artist from the shores of the river Thames. The objects spanned centuries and species – some already, some soon extinct –, fractured gadgets from the early days of technological acceleration juxtaposed with fossils, a hex, and other elements. The presentation furthered Kramer’s exploration of temporality as a trauma of varying scales: human, archaeological and geological. It also elaborated the act of collecting as an act of mourning, the symbolism of burial and the construction of the archival. The project highlighted the often forsaken and ambiguous moment before the completion of an artwork, in this instance a film. Rather than concentrating on the end product, this installation exposed the nonlinear logic and aggregative processes of artistic research.

A reading room adjacent to Kramer’s installation featured theoretical and fictive research material alongside works-in-progress by invited artists Joey Holder and Andrea Zucchini. This opened up multiple pathways into Kramer’s artistic habitat. The space abolished hierarchies between different source materials, revealing their simultaneous presence within a research practice. Two public reading group events further unfolded key themes circulating within Kramer’s work.

Following this presentation, Karen went on to complete the moving-image work The Eye That Articulated Belongs on Land (2016), commissioned by the Jerwood/FVU Award: Borrowed Time.

remarks upon method: Karen Kramer, Epona’s Well was supported by Arts Council England.